Tag Archives: Instagram

Far Out iPhoneography

The more I use Instagram the more I am inspired to do crazy, wacked-out things. That’s the beauty of the immediate, streaming social photography movement. As a result, I’ve gone back to a few apps that I haven’t used in awhile, like Percolator, and am learning how to use them more effectively.

This is my friend Don’s drum, which he wrapped in a beautiful paisley fabric. I took it the other night as he and his band Sweet Leda were setting up for a gig. It’s a cool picture alone, but run through Percolator, it exudes a freaky, whimsical vibe befitting it’s looks. This shot of a bunch of colorful bracelets was also processed in Percolator. Again, the original was cool, but I love how the shapes are enhanced by the app.

It’s tough to sometimes capture a mood when taking pictures, especially if you’re a participant. Two weeks ago, I participated in a fundraiser put on by my local Cross Fit gym, called “Share the Pain” (and boy was I in pain the next few days). My friend Ally and I shared a WOD (Workout Of the Day) then, being the Cross Fit gym member, she had to do a second WOD. I got some shots of her preparing for her second workout, then added some TTV effects in TtV Camera, which I think give the shots a gritty, tough look.

Then there was this shot of Ally’s socks. No real post-processing needed for this shot!

HDR is another effect I’ve been using. It’s not appropriate for all subjects and, much like bokeh, can be easily overused, so I try to use it judiciously. For example, it’s completely ineffective to use it on metal objects. It may enhance the color or give it a weird look, but I really don’t think it’s worth using. HDR looks best to me in shots with lots of natural elements (trees, sky, water, people). That said, here are a few HDR shots from a recent night out at the Dirt Track races in Georgetown, DE.


While these are not my best HDR shots, I love how the inclusion of all levels of exposure brings out each individual person, along with details in the fence, bleachers and track.

The next two shots are collages I made with Frametastic. I was killing some time at work when this box of medicine vials caught my eye.

I liked the original, but took it up a notch in Frametastic.

The next collage was inspired by my fingernail polish. I took the kids to the boardwalk for an afternoon out and we all noticed how many things matched the color. I turned it into a photo game and this is the end result.

Here are a few random shots that I really like. They were processed in Camera+ and Vintique.

You never know what inspiration you’ll find when you look up. Here are two stand-outs.

These last two shots are macros of ordinary things. When it gets slow at work (which isn’t very often) I try to look around and get inspired, which can be tough at a hospital. Last night I just couldn’t find ANYTHING, until I started looking at my surroundings with a graphic, abstract frame of mind. Here’s a stack of stapled papers taken and processed in Camera+.

When I got home last night, I found tiny little pencils on the kitchen counter. My daughter Zoe had made them for her dolls to use by coloring toothpicks with markers. They were so realistic looking! This is how I captured them this morning with Camera+.

Kind of fitting considering it’s almost time for everyone to go back to school. Speaking of which, you’ll notice my posts have gotten a little sporadic. Unfortunately, that trend will probably continue as I go back to school next week to pursue a master’s degree in nursing. My family nurse practitioner program is a 3 1/2 year endeavor that will take a lot of my time and energy, which will leave me with less time to devote to my passions of photography and music. I will still be blogging but it may be on a less regular basis. Stick with me, though, because I’m never going to stop taking pictures. Thanks for your patience and understanding as well as all your feedback.


Instagram is Photographic Crack

I have a problem and its name is Instagram. It’s fun, inspiring and addictive, kind of like crack (or so I’m told). I am an analogue girl at heart, but the instant feedback of this little app is very satisfying. Before I go into a full-blown ode to my newest favorite app, I should probably¬†start the story at the beginning, when I downloaded it.

I’d really appreciate it if you’d help me by clicking on the instacanv.as/ipdegirl link here ūüôā

I’m already a member of some very cool mobile phone photography sites, namely Eye’em and iPhone Art. They’re wonderful sites that feature groups, critiques, event listings and all other kinds of fun things. They both have apps for the iPhone, but to use the features fully you need to be on the web. Much like¬†Flickr¬†, these sites are much better when viewed and surfed on a computer.

Enter Instagram.

I resisted for a while, but finally downloaded it in early 2011. For the longest time, these were the only two photos that graced my Instagallery.

The second photo is truly underwhelming, but I uploaded it anyways. Then, something happened around March. I uploaded pictures from some St. Patrick’s Day shenanigans, then, I uploaded pictures of my Mud Run in April. By the time I went to Florida in May, I was in full-blown Instagram-uploading mode. I couldn’t tell you what the catalyst for all of this activity was (maybe other photog’s uploads, the ability easily post to FB?) but my Instagram portfolio took off.

Enter the e-book “Instagram Uncovered” by Guy Yang and Audrey Taylor of The Beginner’s Lens. Yang and Taylor break Instagram down in this guide. From the absolute basics, like how to upload and ‘like’ photos, to tips on tagging your photos and getting enough ‘likes’ to make it to the popular gallery, this guide is a must-read for any Instagram user. For example, I had zero likes on my pictures until I started tagging my photos. As soon as I started tagging, I started getting noticed. I’m not on the popular page or anything, but it is cool to know that other photographers are seeing my work.

For me, the truly addictive part of Instagram is the immediacy with which I get feedback, along with the fact that it was specifically designed for use on the mobile phone. As soon as someone likes or comments on one of my photos, I receive a silent notification. Now THAT’S instant gratification. Even more fun, and possibly more addictive, is how easy it is to search for and view works by other artists. I liken it to looking up a word in the dictionary. If you’re a nerd, like me, you’d flip through the book looking for your word but, inevitably, get distracted by some other crazy, exotic sounding word that you just HAD to find out the meaning of. Ten minutes later, you’d forgotten the word you were looking up, but had learned the definition of at least seven new words along the way. That’s Instagram. It’s even inspired me to want to try some crazy stuff that I’d never consider before, like layering lots of filters and effects to make a photo that looks like some crazy sci-fi fantasy.

The shots in this post are all macro shots of flowers and an agave plant, taken with my magnifying loupe and processed through Filtermania 2 (which I’ll review next week). ¬†If you want to catch more of my iPhoneography, in real-time, hit me up on Instagram under the user name ipdegirl and while you’re at it, help me get an Instacanvas shop by clicking here. An Instacanvas gallery allows you to purchase any of my Instagram photos on a canvas for a very reasonable price. While you’re at it, let me know if you are on Instagram in the comment section below.

 


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