Tag Archives: Beach

Time Traveling the Hipstamatic Way

Hipstamatic’s new Tintype SnapPak has me feeling like I’ve taken a trip back to the early days of photography. It’s Tinto lens gives a selective focus that can be haunting and beautiful, especially when combined with either the D-Type or C-Type film filters.

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This newest pack gives your pictures the look of an old tin-type photo. It’s fun to see modern subjects juxtaposed with the antique format.

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James M lens, C-Type Plate film

I used my favorite new combo one foggy day in Annapolis, MD and got some beautiful, moody shots around City Dock and the Naval Academy.

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Today we took a cold walk on the beach at Cape Henlopen State Park. Here are some of those images.

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Currently, I’m in the middle of editing some Revolog film pictures I took in Las Vegas, Nevada. I’m going to post them very soon. My spring semester starts in a few days and I’ll soon be back to studying and writing.

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Is That a Light Saber or Revolog Lazer?

One of the staples of the Structure line of handmade films from Revolog, Lazer will give your pictures a touch of science fiction fabulosity, as if Darth Vader and Luke Skywalker were staging a light saber duel inside your camera. Dazzling green lines appear randomly throughout your roll of film. The effect is more subtle in over exposed shots and brighter in properly and under exposed frames.

Here’s the Lazer effect on an accidentally taken-in-my-photo-bag shot. I never intend to do this, but it’s fun to see the effects in their naked form (so to speak).

One of the first shots on this roll of film is also one of my favorites. Not only did I get a little light leaking, but I got a great green line. This roll was taken in my Smena 8.

I love the look of Lazer in my shots without people.

It’s not as nice through someone’s face, but it’s still interesting.

The first shots on this roll were taken at Playland, the amusement park on the Rehoboth Beach boardwalk. It’s one of my favorite places to take photos because it’s just so loud and colorful and crazy.

In this double exposure shot you can see a faint light green line on the right side.

This long exposure carousel shot also shows the green line on the right side of the photo.

Overall, I’m digging Lazer, although for shots of people, I’d prefer another roll of Revolog film, like Tesla or Volvox. With Lazer, you can go for an overall ironic look to your photographs, like taking shots of a Civil War Re-enactment with Lazer. Better yet would be to take pictures of a sword fight at a Renaissance Festival with Lazer. Now that would be something!

Yes, that’s a bacon-wrapped beer bottle on the cover of that magazine


Holga Microclicks

I’ve been wanting to try microclicks for a long time and I finally got around to doing it earlier this year. For those of you who are unfamiliar with this technique, microclicks is a way of making an overlapping panoramic shot in a Holga or Diana. You aim the camera at your subject, take a picture and instead of winding to the next frame you just wind it 3 or 4 clicks and take another shot. Make sure you turn about 20 degrees every few shots and eventually you’ll have a dreamy panoramic picture that spans the width of 2 to 3 frames of medium format film or, if you choose, you can make the entire roll into one large panoramic photo.

For this roll I used my Holga with Ilford’s Super XP2, iso 400 and a yellow filter. If you’re doing this in sunny situations, a filter will be necessary to counteract any overexposure. As you can see in this first shot, taken at the Philly Art Museum, the yellow filter didn’t really help. I was trying to take a shot of the outside of the building from the Rocky Steps.

Oh well. Here are a couple more photos from that day.

Long exposure of a window in the museum’s cafe

 

 I did make some successful microclicks when I took my Holga and yellow filter to the beach.

I’m very happy with these results! I got these by aiming, clicking, advancing the film 4 clicks and turning slightly after each advancement of the film. Next time, I’ll only advance the film 2 or 3 clicks and make a slight turn every 3 or 4 shots. It’s a really fun technique.

Here are two non-microclick pictures from our beach day. The yellow filter really makes for wonderful contrast in these pictures. I’m going to have to start using it more often.


Ilford’s 3200 speed B&W film + Fuji Natura Classica = magic!

Yes, it’s another Fuji Natura Classica post, but this one is a little different. Here are the results from the 3200 iso Ilford film, which a friend of mine told me really acts more like 1600 iso film. This is the first time I’ve used this film (I never really had a reason to use it before) and I’m very pleased with the results. Overall, the high-speed black and white film photos are much nicer than the color photos I took using 1600 iso film.

For one thing, the contrast is phenomenal.

This tree picture looks almost like an HD digital picture! I also love the way the pine needles were captured on the floor of the woods.

The weather was overcast on the day I took these shots, but it wasn’t much of a challenge for this film and camera combo.

I also took some photos at the beach at dusk.

See the lights in the background?

 The following pictures were taken at a restaurant. I wanted to see just how low I could go with the lighting.

 

Finally, I took some pictures of my favorite, rusty road sign.

 The Natura Classica plus Ilford 3200 iso film is a winning combination! I usually develop my own black and white film, but I sent this roll out to be developed by someone (or something) that can load the film onto a spool without screwing it up. I still haven’t quite mastered that skill, but because I plan on buying many more rolls of this film, I guess I’ll get more opportunities to practice.


What I Learned From a Bad Roll of Film

Being less-than-thrilled by the results of a film photo shoot is a bummer, but that’s the life of an analogue photographer. When this happens to me I always try to find out a) what went wrong and b) what went right. The results on this roll from my Canon AT-1 are a prime example.

My camera was loaded with Fuji Chrome, iso 100 slide film and had the 28-80mm zoom lens attached. The first few shots of this roll were taken indoors. I tried to do some light painting using Christmas tree lights. I also took a macro-type shot of an orchid.

Both unexciting shots, but they help to tell this story. Next, we went for a walk on the beach. It was a beautiful and unseasonably warm January afternoon. Also on this expedition I took along my Fuji Natura Classica and shot some of the pictures in this blog post. When I didn’t have to worry about light metering with the Fuji, my results were really nice. With my Canon, it was a different story.

I completely forgot there was a light meter on the camera. I suppose that’s what happens when you work with simple cameras most of the time.

The exposure isn’t the greatest on any of these, plus my film must have been expired, which helps to explain the bluish tint. Look at the first picture again and you’ll see a lovely little element entering the picture from the middle of the top…those lovely sunbursts. I continued to get them in these pictures and really love the way they look.

There were a couple of shots which made this roll worth it, namely these two that I took from an odd angle.

Clearly what went wrong here was my exposure time. In almost every shot, I completely forgot about light metering. Slide film always needs a little more light and the slow speed of the film I was using didn’t help. On the positive side, I love the sunbursts and the unusual POV I took in the last few shots.

So you see, just because you think a roll is a disaster, you may be mistaken. It’s always important to learn from your mistakes, in photography and in real life, and appreciate the beauty that was actually captured.


Overlapping Goodness

I have been using my Holga without either the 12 or 16 frame mask and getting some really nice results. I love the exaggerated vignetting and light leaks that occurred on every picture. These pictures all come from The Art of Waiting roll from September 2010, shot on Fuji Velvia.

I also got some really nice overlapping pictures. I don’t remember if these were intentional or not, but they’re still really cool. Here’s one example.

The two shots just bleed right into each other. I really like it. Here are the shots separately. I don’t think they are nearly as interesting.

Here are a few more overlapped shots shown together and then singly.

Unlike the first example, I think these two pictures stand well on their own

This was on the end of the roll. The shot on the left is pretty underexposed so it doesn’t stand well on it’s own.

Here is my favorite overlap on the roll…

…and the two pictures separately, which I think stand pretty well on their own.

I love happy little accidents. I’m going to have it printed and see what it looks like ‘for real’.

Tomorrow I’m going to Philadelphia to see the Van Gogh exhibit. I’m taking the Fuji Natura Classica and am hoping for some good photo ops.


Lost Film Found

Funny things happen when you start to clean up your office, like finding rolls of film that you thought had been developed. Remember that cool FlashFun camera my friend Pam gave me?

I can finally share with you the first roll of film I ran through it. It was taken in the summertime on a hazy day at the beach. One of my best friends and her husband were visiting for the weekend. Brad is probably going to kill me for posting these pictures, but he’ll have to drive two hours to do it first!

This is Brad. My BFF Loretta just doesn’t trust him to put on his own sunblock. He burns in 5 seconds outside and she didn’t want to take any chances

Elias getting buried in the sand by Emme, one of Loretta and Brad’s daughters

Four of the kids tentatively going in the ocean. It was a little chilly that day.

Ruby, one of my favorite little people and the second of Loretta and Brad’s daughters

Random shot that I forgot I took with the camera. We were in Gettysburg for a soccer tourney.

Overall, I’m totally digging this camera. The light leaks are very cool and so is the overall exposure level. I wasn’t sure those beach shots would turn out, since the light was so grayish, but they look rather nice. My roll of 127 film should have yielded eight exposures but I only got five. That very well could’ve been my fault, but I can’t be sure until I run another roll of film through. If it is indeed a flaw of the camera, I’m going to have to try some microclick-type action with it.

Speaking of which, I also got a roll back from my Art of Waiting project from September. I ran some Fuji Velvia through my Holga (minus the 12 or 16 mask that usually fits in the back) got some wicked-cool melded-together pictures, but you’ll have to wait until next week for that 😉


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